Novena of St. Philip Neri, Day 2

May 18 – Philip’s Devotion

The inward flame of devotion in Philip was so intense that he sometimes fainted in consequence of it, or was forced to throw himself upon his bed, under the sickness of divine love.

When he was young he sometimes felt this divine fervour so vehemently as to be unable to contain himself, throwing himself as if in agony on the ground and crying out, “No more, Lord, no more.”

What St. Paul says of himself seemed to be fulfilled in Philip: “I am filled with consolation – I over-abound with joy.”

Yet, though he enjoyed sweetnesses, he used to say that he wished to serve God, not out of interest—that is, because there was pleasure in it—but out of pure love, even though he felt no gratification in loving Him.

When he was a layman, he communicated every morning. When he was old, he had frequent ecstacies during his Mass.

Hence it is customary in pictures of Philip to paint him in red vestments, to record his ardent desire to shed his blood for the love of Christ.

He was so devoted to his Lord and Saviour that he was always pronouncing the name of Jesus with unspeakable sweetness. He had also an extraordinary pleasure in saying the Creed, and he was so fond of the “Our Father” that he lingered on each petition in such a way that it seemed as if he never would get through them.

He had such a devotion to the Blessed Sacrament that, when he was ill, he could not sleep till he had communicated.

When he was reading or meditating on the Passion he was seen to turn as pale as ashes, and his eyes filled with tears.

Once when he was ill, they brought him something to drink. He took the glass in his hand, and when he was putting it to his mouth stopped, and began to weep most bitterly. He cried out, “Thou, my Christ, Thou upon the Cross wast thirsty, and they gave Thee nothing but gall and vinegar to drink; and I am in bed, with so many comforts around me, and so many persons to attend to me.”

Yet Philip did not make much account of this warmth and acuteness of feeling; for he said that Emotion was not Devotion, that tears were no sign that a man was in the grace of God, neither must we suppose a man holy merely because he weeps when he speaks of religion.

Philip was so devoted to the Blessed Virgin that he had her name continually in his mouth. He had two ejaculations in her honour. One, “Virgin Mary, Mother of God, pray to Jesus for me.” The other, simply “Virgin Mother,” for he said that in those two words all possible praises of Mary are contained.

He had also a singular devotion to St. Mary Magdalen, on whose vigil he was born, and for the Apostles St. James and St. Philip; also for St. Paul the Apostle, and for St. Thomas of Aquinum, Doctor of the Church.

Prayer

Philip, my glorious Patron, gain for me a portion of that gift which thou hadst so abundantly. Alas! thy heart was burning with love; mine is all frozen towards God, and alive only for creatures. I love the world, which can never make me happy; my highest desire is to be well off here below. O my God, when shall I learn to love nothing else but Thee? Gain for me, O Philip, a pure love, a strong love, and an efficacious love, that, loving God here upon earth, I may enjoy the sight of Him, together with thee and all saints, hereafter in heaven.

Novena of St. Philip Neri, Day 1

oratoirest_ph_neriMay 17 – Philip’s Humility

If Philip heard of anyone having committed a crime, he would say, “Thank God that I have not done worse.”

At confession he would shed abundance of tears, and say, “I have never done a good action.”

When a penitent showed that she could not bear the rudeness shown towards him by certain persons who were under great obligations to him, he answered her, “If I were humble, God would not send this to me.”

When one of his spiritual children said to him, “Father, I wish to have something of yours for devotion, for I know you are a Saint,” he turned to her with a face full of anger, and broke out into these words: “Begone with you! I am a devil, and not a saint.”

To another who said to him, “Father, a temptation has come to me to think that you are not what the world takes you for,” he made answer: “Be sure of this, that I am a man like my neighbours, and nothing more.”

If he heard of any who had a good opinion of him, he used to say, “O poor me! how many poor girls will be greater in Paradise than I shall be!”

He avoided all marks of honour. He could not bear to receive any signs of respect. When people wished to touch his clothes, and knelt as he passed by, he used to say, “Get up! get out of my way!” He did not like people to kiss his hand; though he sometimes let them do so, lest he should hurt their feelings.

He was an enemy to all rivalry and contention. He always took in good part everything that was said to him. He had a particular dislike of affectation, whether in speaking, or in dressing, or in anything else.

He could not bear two-faced persons; as for liars, he could not endure them, and was continually reminding his spiritual children to avoid them as they would a pestilence.

He always asked advice, even on affairs of minor importance. His constant counsel to his penitents was, that they should not trust in themselves, but always take the advice of others, and get as many prayers as they could.

He took great pleasure in being lightly esteemed, nay, even despised.

He had a most pleasant manner of transacting business with others, great sweetness in conversation, and was full of compassion and consideration.

He had always a dislike to speak of himself. The phrases “I said,” “I did,” were rarely in his mouth. He exhorted others never to make a display of themselves, especially in those things which tended to their credit, whether in earnest or in joke.

As St. John the Evangelist, when old, was continually saying, “Little children, love one another,” so Philip was ever repeating his favourite lesson, “Be humble; think little of yourselves.”

He said that if we did a good work, and another took the credit of it to himself, we ought to rejoice and thank God.

He said no one ought to say, “Oh! I shall not fall, I shall not commit sin,” for it was a clear sign that he would fall. He was greatly displeased with those who made excuses for themselves, and called such persons. “My Lady Eve,” because Eve defended herself instead of being humble.

Prayer

Philip, my glorious patron, who didst count as dross the praise, and even the good esteem of men, obtain for me also, from my Lord and Saviour, this fair virtue by thy prayers. How haughty are my thoughts, how contemptuous are my words, how ambitious are my works. Gain for me that low esteem of self with which thou wast gifted; obtain for me a knowledge of my own nothingness, that I may rejoice when I am despised, and ever seek to be great only in the eyes of my God and Judge.

Novena to St. Philip Neri

Prayer FrontThe Novena to St. Philip Neri begins tomorrow, in preparation for his Feast Day on May 26.  Please pray this Novena with us, and with Oratorians around the whole world.  In a special way, we pray this year for the completion of our Pious House and our ultimate establishment as an Oratory.

Mark down on your calendar two special events: First Solemn Vespers on May 25 at 3 pm at Old St. Mary Church and the Solemn Mass for St. Philip Neri on May 26 9:30 am.  A light reception will follow Mass in Fr. Felten Hall.

St. Philip Neri, pray for us!

Old St. Mary Church
123 East 13th Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202

Novena to St. Philip Neri

Br. Adrian Ordained to the Diaconate

10312540_624577740953656_3306961647695100526_nBr. Adrian was ordained a transitional deacon by the Most Rev. Joseph Binzer, Auxiliary Bishop of Cincinnati.  More pictures to come, but here is a picture from after the ordination.  Thank you to everyone for their prayers and support!

Br. Adrian Ordination to the Diaconate

AJIt is with great joy that the Community-in-Formation announces the ordination to the diaconate of one of its founding members, Br. Adrian J. Hilton.  A long time parishioner of Old St. Mary’s Church, the parish where the community is based, Br. Adrian entered the seminary in 2006.  Attending the Pontifical College Josephinum, he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Philosophy and Classics, graduating in 2010.  Br. Adrian has been studying at Mount St. Mary’s Seminary of the West since 2010, and has one year left before his ordination to the priesthood on May 16, 2015.  We congratulate Br. Adrian on this important step in his formation.  Everyone is welcome to the Ordination, and to the Solemn Mass the following day at Old St. Mary’s.  Information is below.  Ad multo annos

Ordination, April 26, 2014 at 11:00 a.m.
Cathedral of St. Peter in Chains
Corner of Plum and Eighth Street in Downtown Cincinnati
Most Rev. Joseph Binzer, Auxiliary Bishop of Cincinnati, ordaining prelate

Solemn Mass, April 27, 2014 at 9:15
Old St. Mary’s Church in Over-the-Rhine
123 East Thirteenth Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
A light reception follows